• Frank Furedi
  • Frank Furedi
  • Sociologist, commentator and author

""

Yes—this I hold to with devout insistence, Wisdom's last verdict goes to say: He only earns both freedom and existence. Who must reconquer them each day.

Goethe's Faust

Goethe's Faust

Latest articles

We need to inject some humanism into British politics

The UK general election campaign has exposed the paucity of liberal thinking.

A baby is not a chattel

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The SNP: playing the anti-politics card to gain power

Nicola Sturgeon is bashing 'Westminster insiders' in the hope of becoming one.

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First World War: Still No End in Sight

That the conflicts unleashed by Great War did not end in 1918 is well known. World War II and the Cold War clearly constitute key moments in the drama that began in August 1914. This book argues that the battle of ideas which crystallised during the course of the Great War continue to the present. It claims that the disputes about lifestyles and identity - the Culture Wars of today -are only the latest expressions of a century long conflict.

There are many influences that contributed to the outbreak of World War One. One significant influence was the cultural tension and unease that disposed significant numbers of artists, intellectuals and young people to regard the War as an opportunity give meaning to their existence. Later these tensions merged with social unrest and expressed themselves through the new ideologies of the Left and the Right. While these ideologies have become exhausted the conflicts of culture persist to this date. That is why there is Still No End In Sight for the battle of ideas set in motion in August 1914.

Modern wars did not only lead to the loss of millions of lives. Wars also played a significant role in changing attitudes towards the political ideals of modern time. The Great War called into question the future of liberal democracy. It led to the emergence of radical ideologies, which were in turn discredited through the experience of the Second World War and the Cold War. The current Culture Wars have significantly eroded the status of the values associated with modernity.

Through exploring the battle of ideas set in motion in August 1914 - First World War: Still No End In Sight provides a framework for understanding the changing focus of political conflict from ideology to culture.

Buy this book from Amazon (UK).

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Why the Armenian genocide still haunts the world

Many of the tensions of the Great War remain scarily unresolved.

Islam vs liberalism: the classroom’s silent Culture War

Teachers are afraid of tackling difficult questions in front of pupils.

What’s behind the fashion for banning?

Barely a day passes without someone demanding a ban on something.

Inside Education

Frank recently appeared on this show produced by 103.2 Dublin City FM.

video

Risk, fear and terror in the twenty-first century

Frank in conversation with Professor Anthony Elliott, from a series of ‘Hawke Talks’ produced by the Hawke Research Institute at the University of South Australia.

Kidulthood: why are we terrified of growing up?

As new research suggests that our brains don't reach adulthood until our mid-twenties, Sam Rowe asks whether we're becoming a generation of commitment phobic 'kidults'.

Fifty Shades Of Grey: Why has porn become mainstream?

As the widely anticipated film version of best-selling novel Fifty Shades Of Grey hits the cinemas on Valentine's Day, sociology professor Frank Furedi explores why porn has become mainstream. Interview by Samantha Payne.

Review: First World War: Still No End in Sight

By Damian Howard SJ.

Jihadister indtager de sociale medier

Den militante gruppe IS er ikke bare jihadister og terrorister. Via de sociale medier har gruppen skabt sig et frygtindgydende brand, som også fascinerer unge danskere – nogle med tilknytning til salafistiske grupperinger herhjemme, andre der ikke er særligt religiøse. Og det er ikke så underligt, siger forskere, for Vesten har selv fremelsket det dystopiske syn på samtiden som korrupt og dekadent, som ekstremismen er en reaktion på.